Banned Book Week Day Three – Children’s Books

When I began researching for Banned Book Week I naturally assumed that the majority of the banned or challenged books would those that many adults find “subversive.” You know, Mein Kampf, The Anarchist Cookbook, even some of the existential writings of Satre or Camus. I was so wrong. The MOST OFTEN challenged and banned books in the US are children’s books and the most challenged of all writers is be the beloved Judy Blume. WTH!? I had to read further to understand because clearly I was a “bad” parent. My kids read ALL of the books – LOL! Below are a few of the books that have been banned by certain school libraries in the US:

In 1986, the West Allis Milwaukee School District banned this particular poetry collection because of “drug reference, suicide, death and a disrespect for truth and authority.” Shortly after, a school district in Pennsylvania did the same.
Harriet, it seems, was too smart for her own good. This book was banned because parents were concerned it was teaching kids to “lie, spy, talk back and curse.”  I have news for you – kids are learning to lie, back talk and curse from their parents, peers and president, not from Harriet the Spy
The addition of this book to the list breaks my heart. Have you ever read a more wonderful story or seen more beautifully illustrated pages? A favorite of children all over the world, this book was banned by many southern states for depicting child abuse (the no-go supper for Max), it’s also been challenged for being “too dark” and showing supernatural elements. Hey, I was raised in the south. Going without supper was the least abusive form of child abuse I encountered!

However, the most challenged author of all, including “adult books” is Judy Blume, the author of “Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret.” I’m not sure I would have made it through the tween/early teen years with this book. My parents were of the ultra conservative bordering on cult religion and we did not speak of anything remotely dealing with our bodies. Nope. Books like this were a resource for me more than just enjoyable reading. But let’s look at another of Blume’s banned books: Blubber. Have you or kids read Blubber?

Blubber is about bullying – really serious bullying. It revolves around a group of girls who bully another group, then that group gets more girls together and they torture the original group of girls who re-groups with different girls and torture the second group and on and on and on. You know, real life stuff here. Seriously! The reason the book was banned was because parents didn’t agree with the fact that none of the girls were punished. HELLO!?! Bullies seldom are punished – in our schools, in our neighborhoods, in our politics or in our presidency!! I was 4 foot 11 inches tall. To say that I got bullied is an understatement. Add to that the aforementioned religious aspect and I was tortured. No one ever got punished – EXCEPT FOR ME!! Geesh. Do parents live in some kind or drug induced bubble that they do not realize this!?! (sigh) I could rant on for ages but I think Judy Blume, herself, explains this perfectly:

“When I started to write, it was the ’70s, and throughout that decade, we didn’t have any problems with book challenges or censorship. It all started really in a big way in 1980 … It came with the election, the presidential election of 1980, and the next day, I’ve been told, the censors were crawling out of the woodwork and challenging, like, ‘It’s our turn now, and we’re going to say what we don’t want our children to read.,” Blume says. “”But I think it’s more than that. It’s what we don’t want our children to know, what we don’t want to talk to our children about; and if they read it, they’ll know it, or they’ll question it.”

Well. Isn’t that the purpose behind ALL bannings and censorship: We don’t want you to know because then you’ll know and you will question it.

READ BANNED BOOKS!!! Be the one who knows!

13 thoughts on “Banned Book Week Day Three – Children’s Books

  1. They banned The Gruffalo? Really? I was really upset when the libraries in New Zealand banned Enid Blyton’s Noddy series which must have been in the mid to late eighties. At that stage they thought he was gay. Then in the nineties he was allowed back. Now poor Noddy is banned again because the books are racist – the naughty golliwog. 🤷‍♀️🤦‍♀️ It seems, Mackey, that poor Noddy just can’t win.

    Why don’t they ban WWE and all that other stupid stuff on TV that teaches children nothing except that violence is okay?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh poor Noddy!! I couldn’t agree with you more about WWE, etc. Kids are allowed to play whatever types of video games they choose – regardless of ratings – and yet we protect their precious sensibilities by banning marvelous books! People who prefer violence over any type of sexual references in our books never cease to astound me Sandy.

      Liked by 1 person

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