Banned Book Week – Day 4: Beulah Land by Lonnie Coleman

I had no idea this book was still around but I’m so glad that it is!! When I was 15 years old, I was reading this book at the suggestion of a US history buff (I wanted to go to university and major in history – and did) who said it was the antithesis of Gone With the Wind; that Beulah Land was the real version of the “old south.” They were correct – to an extent. The book centers on the Kendrick family, a wealthy southern family who owned hundreds of slaves. What I remember most about the book is the Kendrick sons who repeatedly either raped or had non-violent but non-consensual sex with the young female slaves. Certainly Scarlett Ohara never talked about that, did she? Can you imagine Rhett Butler raping a slave girl? Well, yes, yes I can! But, of course, we never see that in Martha Mitchell’s rose colored tale. The Kendrick family’s saga is typical of the old south: the gentrified white plantation owner barely hanging on to his land, wealthy sons who think they can take whatever they want, hardworking African Americans – some treated decently while others are whipped to death. If you’re going to read a book about the “old south” this is the one to read.

I’m highlighting this book during banned book week – not because it was banned by a community but because it was “banned” by my parents. When my mother caught me reading the sex scenes in this book, she promptly threw the book in the trash. That is what well-meaning parents do, right? Not so fast…. first, I went to my local library, checked out the book and read it in secret! I now OWN the book and my kids have read it. My mother did the same thing with the book, “Go Ask Alice.” I own a copy of that one, too, and my kids read it as well. Parents are not going to stop kids from reading books with which the parent disagrees. Wouldn’t it be better to discuss the book like intelligent human beings rather than “banning” the books in question? The sex scenes in Beulah Land are not so different from the biblical account of Solomon and his lover (whom we now know was Ethiopian) but parents don’t throw away the Bible to keep their child from reading the Songs of Solomon, now do they? Or the stories of David who “took” Bathsheba and had her husband killed so that he could marry her. “Took” being the Catholic monk version of rape.

My point of today’s post to shine a little light on the ways we “ban” books without banning them at all and the hypocrisy of those who do choose to ban books. Censorship is just another form of ignorance – don’t pass this on to your children, please.

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