The Rain #ECFisher @BooksGoSocial

Beware of The Rain and what it will bring to your town….

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Thirty years ago, Charlie Hamilton was the owner of High Tide Camp, a youth camp for middle schoolers. However, that fateful summer, the kids took their bullying and pranks too far and one of them ends up dead. Now it is time for revenge and it is coming with…The Rain.

The Rain is a very short story or novella that is creepy and campy all at once. The descriptions and the characters are perfectly drawn allowing the atmosphere to be scary and a bit horrifying. However, the dialogue was a stumbling block for me. No where does it mention that this is a horror book for younger readers but the style of writing suggested that it might be and certainly that is the age level that I would recommend for this story. It is just too campy to be an adult horror read. It wasn’t that it was bad, just not up to the usual standards for adult horror. I did, however, thoroughly enjoy reading it. It had the aura of the old Twilight Zone television show – creepy, scary but a tad bit over the top. It will be book that I think of each time it rains and I bet you will too if you read it!

Thanks to #Netgalley and #BooksGoSocial for my copy of this fun read.

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Sadie

Oh Sadie, Sadie, Sadie…. how you stole my heart. I give Sadie FIVE stars and FIVE moons too!

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Sadie is a young girl set on revenge against the man she is certain has murdered her sister. Her life has been hard, the daughter of an alcoholic mother and non-existent father, Sadie has raised herself and her sister with the help of an older, loving neighbor. After her mother’s disappearance from their lives, Sadie continues to take care of her sister alone until the fateful night that her sister is savagely murdered. Sadie knows who did it despite the fact that the police have done nothing and followed no leads. Sadie disappears into the night looking for the killer, leaving no clues behind and telling no one her destination.

This is where the story begins: Sadie is missing and the loving neighbor wants to know where she is, what has happened to her. She elicits the help of a very skeptical podcast reporter who has done some podcasts about interesting people in rural areas. The author uses both first hand accounts from Sadie and the podcast episodes. While I’m beginning to think that the use of blogs and podcasts in literature are becoming a crutch and a little too overused, in this particular instance it works very well. The author uses the reporter to ask a question and then, seamlessly, flows into the character’s response on the podcast. There were times that I could easily imagine how this would have sounded and what it would have looked like “on air.” Rather than being a crutch, it became an enhancement to the story. The book also is specially geared toward “young adults” and I think this type of writing works for them.

With that in mind – the “young adult” aspect of this book – I think this is the first time I’ve read something within this genre in which I truly felt that the story had merit. When I was a young adult or younger, we were offered amazing stories that told the grittier, darker side of being a teen. S E Hinton’s series, The Outsiders, or the horrific tale, Go Ask Alice,” were required reading for teens and young adults. Somewhere along the way, Harry Potter became the norm, for adults and kids alike, and I think that books with substance took a back seat. Sadie, however, is a real coming of age story about rural America, alcohol and drugs, runaways and the horror that far too many young people and young adults must deal with as a regular part of their existence. There is no sugar-coating here, no happy endings for everyone: this is life and it is told expertly. Sadie is a book that I will read again and again and recommend to every reader I know. It is a must read for teens and young adults. It is a story for this generation in today’s society, a story that will stand the test of time.

A million thanks to #CourtneySummers for writing such an astounding book; to #Netgalley and #StMartinsPress for my advanced copy.

 

Angels Can’t Swim – a novella

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I don’t often read books from first time authors who are not represented by a publishing company; however, lately I have found that many of these books – while a bit more roughly edited – are like finding diamonds in the rough. Angels Can’t Swim is a perfect example!

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There are three girls, competitive swimmers, each holding secrets inside of them that have the potential to destroy their swimming careers and, ultimately, their lives. As the novella unfolds, we learn about each of the girls: their passions, their fears, their innermost thoughts and feelings.

One is beautiful, talented but holding back in the pool because of her secret.

One is gay, barely out of the closet and not yet comfortable in her own skin.

One is seemingly “perfect,” not the best swimmer on the team but the one who appears to have her act together.

However, before the book is finished each of these girls must confront a pregnancy, bulimia and rape.

In a very straight forward account of these three girls, you will become engrossed in their stories. There was a part of me, the editor/proofreader in me, that wanted to edit the writing, but then I realized that this very blunt, unvarnished account is what makes this story so compelling – and it is very gripping. Perhaps it’s because I’m a mother of diver who competed with the US Olympic Diving team, but these stories were so real that I simply could not put it down. From start to finish, which only too a few hours, I never once stopped reading!

The author was a competitive swimmer and she writes as only someone who has been there/done that, can do. I suspect that she personally knew girls who experienced each of these things and I hope that they, too, came out on the other side as a whole and not in pieces. Sadly, I watched too many female divers who did not.

Angels Can’t Swim is not just for athletes, although their lives never are as wonderful as you would think. It is for women of all ages who struggle with self-perception. However, it is specially written for young women who need to know, absolutely should know, that always are people who are willing to help, listen and care. This book affected me deeply and I encourage all women to read it. Again, it is short, only 100 pages, and each page is well worth your read.

I’m giving it 4 stars simply because it did need editing – the story, however, is a solid 5+ stars! You can find this book now at Amazon. Angles Can’t Swim at Amazon  My appreciation to Alexandra McCann, the author, for sharing this book with me.